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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important iss
was in education in new york state. they have a pretty good retirement program. which i had, of course. so i had a good retirement, social security, compensation check from the veterans, a small one. so i was pretty well set financially to take care of myself. >> sreenivasan: then the couple suffered a string of devastating medical problems. georgia was the first to have to live full time at the nursing home but she fought it tooth and nail. >> i really had a breakdown when they told me i was staying. my heart was set on getting better. i tried and tried and tried. one day we had a meeting with, you know, everyone that was involved. they convinced me that i was number one it was very hard to take, i would never walk again. i can't even stand up completely. >> sreenivasan: their daughter mary ellen became their primary caregiver. she remembers well the stress she was under when a series of serious medical conditions nearly took her dad down. >> there were countless trips in and out of johns hopkins. while i'm taking care of him i'm also still taking my mom to and from her doctors' appointments. i
that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of positive news coming from construction. but in a lot of the business services and goods-producing industries and manufacturing, things look pretty soft at this moment. >> reporter: in addition, 2,000 temporary jobs were cut, which is often looked at as a barameter of future employment. but, the average work week rose to 34-and a half hours... and employers typically boost the workload of existing staff.. before taking on new workers. with all these cross-currents, the employment situation may be but the bottom line seems to be that the economy is improving, but not nearly as quickly as most people would like. >> we lost so many jobs during the great recession, that we are slowly clawing our way out of that hole.. but still at a pretty slow pace." >> reporter: the government's next jobs report will come out just 4 days before the presidential election. by then, many voters will have made up their minds. so, the impact of today's data may be more political.. than economic. erika miller, nbr, ny >> reporter: the employment r
and the-- see, the president has a number of discreet constituents-- latinos, working women, college-educated women-- to whom he has spoken. the thing. a national debate, you're speaking to everybody at the same time. there's no demographic cliques or subgroups. it's everybody. that's consider i think debates are so important. >> woodruff: we're popping the popcorn. we're on the edge of our seats. we'll see both of you in three hours. we will be back at 9:00 p.m. eastern for special coverage of this debate but our effort effoe ongoing online. we will have a live scream where you can watch the debate and live analysis from our team. we're send our "newshour" hat-cam to a debate watch party here in washington. following the debate, "newshour" political editor christina belland tony will be talking to undecide voters at a google-plus hang out >> ifill: still to come on the "newshour": rough flying for american airlines; the pope's butler on trial in rome; chasing the early voters in iowa; a medical breakthrough for critically ill infants and jim lehrer on past debates. but first, with the other
education piece that will continue to be rolled out. you know, and the fact that poll workers can actually still ask people for i.d.s although they don't have to produce it in order to get a regular ballot. we think at the end of the day that the pennsylvania state constitution really does prevent this kind of law from going forward because as the supreme court said it really wantedded to see, you know, make sure that there's no disenfranchisement. we think that there was 760,000 people that the state estimated were going to be impacted by this law. in fact, they have won because they will have access to the ballot in november. >> suarez: representative metcalfe, when is the next biggie leches in pennsylvania after november 6? and will you have time to answer some of ms. browne dianis' complaints? >> we don't need to answer her complaints. the constitution is very clear. this is the responsibility of the legislature. it stands within our area of responsibility to set this process up for the election and ultimately the way the courts have written these decisions, written these opinions it's
't work, and to the collapsing national education system and national infrastructure. >> suarez: he argues that instead of bettering the fortunes of venezuela's 29 million citizens, chavez has institutionalized the corruption he himself once campaigned against, while providing empty revolutionary rhetoric that's polarized the country and scared off foreign investors. >> ( translated ): in 14 years, the president has been playing the same chess moves. nothing has changed at all. all the streets are damaged. socialism of the 21st century. >> suarez: today in caracas, the country's capital, price controls have led to shortages of many goods, and of housing, as the government's tried to rein in an inflation rate among the highest in the world. despite a drastic reduction of those living in extreme poverty, and a robust welfare state financed by oil revenue, 27% of the population still lives in poverty. power outages, as during this 2010 press conference, are frequent. and violent crime has soared over the past decade, as drug- related homicides and kidnappings grow. >> ( translated ): crime is
that we haven't adjusted, or we don't create an educational system that really signals to students and provides them incentives and information that this is where the jobs are. >> reporter: but thrillist and zocdoc aren't giving up, doing all they can to attract workers and make them feel at home. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we'll continue our job retraining coverage with a look at goodwill industries. it's the nation's largest non- profit dedicated to training workers and finding them jobs. and speaking of jobs, tomorrow, the government's monthly jobs report is out-- what it could mean for investors and the presidential election. >> susie: healthy food may soon be coming to a corner near you. two former mcdonald's executives launched lyfe kitchen last year in palo alto, california. now, they plan to take the restaurant and "it's good for you" menu nationwide. diane eastabrook has more. >> reporter: lyfe kitchen opened in the heart of silicon valley a year ago. lyfe, an acronym for "love your food everyday," serves up burgers, fish tacos, breakfast sandwic
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)